Herrin Law | Blog
17672
page,page-id-17672,page-template,page-template-blog-large-image,page-template-blog-large-image-php,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,qode-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,qode-theme-ver-10.0,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.12,vc_responsive

The IRS is scary. They can do more than any other creditor in terms of collections.  They can put liens on your property, including your homestead.  They can garnish your bank account.  They can sell your stuff.  They can close your business and liquidate it. And if you try to call the IRS, you could be on hold for 1 to 2 hours and if you are lucky enough to speak to a representative, they may tell...

If you are in a chapter 13 bankruptcy, then your tax refund is likely the only chance you have at trying to get ahead.  However, the Chapter 13 Trustee will almost always attempt to take your tax refund while in a chapter 13. If you want to keep your tax refund, there are several things that may help. The Trustee’s default position depends on your jurisdiction.  In Dallas and Fort Worth, the Trustee will allow you to keep...

There is not nearly enough being done to help consumers with their student loan debt.  Congress continues to delay the inevitable, and student loan services have very little sympathy for consumers.  They offer very little in terms of workable programs. Sure, they say things like “income based” repayment plans, but these plans very rarely are affordable.  For instance.  I have clients who have credit card debt and pay monthly payments on this debt.  Well, when determining...

Probate is expensive. The costs and time associated with the Probate process have led to many individuals simply forgoing the process altogether, and, consequently, real property is not properly transferred to an individual’s heirs. However, Texas has introduced the Transfer on Death Deed (hereinafter, “T.O.D.D.”), which allows an individual to easily transfer real property to designated Beneficiaries outside of probate. On September 1, 2015, the Texas legislature passed the Texas Real Property Transfer on Death...

An individual issues a hot check (also known as a “Bad Check,” a “NSF Check,” a “Dishonored Check,” or a “Bounced Check”) when they fraudulently write a check despite having knowledge of the fact that they do not have the funds available to cover the check. For example, an individual who issues a check for $500.00 knowing that their bank account only has $250.00, can be charged with an offense for this action. The issue...